The lithographic representation of photographs makes the T206 set a colorful illustration of players from a bygone era. But, T206 cards acquire a special vitality when they capture a player’s signature on his card. A signed T206 card brings the holder back in time, not only to when the player took the field, but also to when he held that card and signed his name, giving the card an incomparable personal touch.

Click Here to see scans of my signed T206 collection  

CONTACT ME if you have a signed pre-war card -- please make sure to let me know about it at SignedT206@gmail.com


Browse a few of my latest articles below…

Clarence “Doc” Steen: Player, Dentist, Autograph Hound

Thanks in large part to memorabilia collector Dan Bretta, I have taken some tremendous strides in recent weeks putting back together the collection of Clarence “Doc” Steen, who may just be the first serious through-the-mail autograph seeker in baseball history. Over about a three-year period (1939-1941), Doc Steen amassed quite the collection of pre-war player autographs on Sporting News and Baseball Magazine supplements (M101-2s, M113s, and M114s), George Burke Photos, and other photographs. Click here or on his photo above to see the latest on my efforts to reconstitute Steen’s old collection.


Tracking Down The Origins Of Signed Cigarette Cards

A lot of suspicion with respect to the authenticity of signed pre-ward cards is driven by the experience of hobbyists, most or whom never even heard of or saw authentic signed pre-war cards being discussed in any public hobby magazine or forum until the last 10 or 15 years. So, with a lot of help from fellow hobbyists, I have been reviewing dozens of old hobby publications from the 1950s and 60s to try to uncover some evidence of their existence. Click the image above to read all about it!


Click the above image to see cards from Jefferson Burdick's collection, which he traded or sold before donating the balance of his enormous hoard to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. How do we know they were his? Because he stamped his name on them.

Click the above image to see cards from Jefferson Burdick's collection, which he traded or sold before donating the balance of his enormous hoard to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. How do we know they were his? Because he stamped his name on them.


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